La Trobe Places

   search the society and FOLTC web sites

This table lists significant places and institutions with connections to Charles Joseph La Trobe.

 Postscript:
   England...
   Switzerland...
   
   
   
   

 Part 2  - Places:
   Melbourne...
   Geelong & District...
   Gippsland...
   Mornington Peninsula...
   Other places...
   La Trobe places names...

 Part 1 - Plaques and other items:
   Melbourne...
   Geelong & District...
   Other Victoria...
   Interstate...
   Europe...
   Other items...

 

Place Location Item Image Description
England     click images to enlarge  
Addington Vale Addington, Kent
 
 
View Map
House
(demolished)
Originally medieval, enlarged and greatly altered in mid-19th century. The La Trobe family lived here from May 1856 to April 1857. Margaret Rose La Trobe (1856-1932) was born at ‘The Vale’. The mid-Victorian wing on the left was added after the La Trobes departed. Pictured c.1940, it was demolished in 1970. During his residency La Trobe sketched the nearby Neolithic cairn.
Athenaeum 107 Pall Mall, London
 
 
Street View
 
View Map
Club
(Grade I listed building)
One of the grandest Regency clubs in London, founded 1824 and known for its Library and learned membership. The building erected in 1830, in neoclassical style and originally two-storeys, has a frieze executed in Bath stone (a copy of the famous Elgin Marbles) around the outside. La Trobe was admitted in March 1855. Engraving 1830   Article
Clapham House Litlington, East Sussex
 
 
View Map
House
(Grade II listed building)
Elegant Georgian house with 16th century origins. Built of local flint stone and greatly extended over the next 200 years. Conveys the grandeur of the classical and warmth of the vernacular in both its interior and exterior decoration. The La Trobe family lived here from September 1867 to February 1876. Sadly, La Trobe was totally blind during this time and died 4 December 1875 at his ‘pretty retreat’. View c.1874
Fairfield Moravian Settlement Droylsden, Manchester

 
Street View
 
View Map
Neighbourhood
(The church, manse and two other houses are Grade II* listed buildings)
Founded 1785 by Rev. Benjamin La Trobe (C J La Trobe’s grandfather) as a centre for evangelistic work of the Moravian Church. His architect son, Benjamin Henry Latrobe, designed the church and some other buildings. The girls’ school continues as the Fairfield High School for Girls; the boys’ school closed in 1891. The settlement includes about 50 cottages, the historic Moravian burial ground, and retains an 18th century atmosphere. Charles Joseph La Trobe spent his later school years here, where he taught c.1820 to 1823. Etching 1818
Fetter Lane Moravian Chapel Fetter Lane, Holborn, London
 
 
Street View
 
View Map
Church (demolished) Founded 1742 as the first Moravian (Church of the United Brethren) chapel in Britain. Charles Joseph La Trobe was born nearby in Kirby Street, Hatton Garden, Holborn, on 20 March 1801 and was baptised in the chapel; both his grandfather and father were leaders in the Moravian Church. Like many churches in the area, St Paul’s Cathedral excepted, it was destroyed by bombing in 1941. The area was rebuilt as a commercial precinct; the congregation was re-established at Chelsea in the 1960s.
Chapel Interior  Plaque
Fulneck Moravian Settlement Pudsey, Leeds, West Yorkshire
 
 
Street View
 
View Map
Neighbourhood
(The chapel and attached ranges to either side, including the boys’ school and girls’ school, are Grade I listed buildings)
Founded 1743 by Count Zinzendorf of Saxony, as a centre for evangelistic work of the Moravian Church. Administered by Rev. Benjamin La Trobe for eleven years from 1757. The chapel building was erected in 1748; the boys' school opened in 1753 and the girls' in 1755 (the two merged in 1992). Christian Ignatius La Trobe was born and educated here, and his son Charles Joseph was a student from age 6 to 18. The settlement was virtually self-sufficient and includes many 18th-century stone houses and the historic Moravian burial ground. Engraving 1861
Ightham Mote Mote Road,
Ivy Hatch, Sevenoaks, Kent
 
 
Street View
 
View Map
House
(Grade I listed building, owned by The National Trust)
A 14th century moated manor house, constructed in 1340, with a number of additions and restorations made to it over the centuries. Comprising a chapel and 70 rooms arranged around a central courtyard, and owned by the Selby family from 1591 to 1889. The La Trobe family lived at ‘The Mote’ from December 1855 to May 1856, when it was only partially habitable. La Trobe made a number of sketches of its architectural features. Sketch1  Sketch2
St John the Baptist Whitbourne, Herefordshire
 
 
View Map
Church
(Grade II* listed building)
A 12th century stone church with a square tower housing six bells, and situated next door to Whitbourne Court, the former manor house of the Bishop of Hereford, where the La Trobe family lived from 1858 to 1866; and adjacent to a handsome rectory. In 1865 the church interior was extensively remodelled. East window
St Martin Ryarsh, Kent
 
 
Street View
 
View Map
Church
(Grade II* listed building)
Church of Norman origin with a solid crenellated 15th century tower. The La Trobe family worshipped at St Martin when they lived nearby at Addington Vale, in the neighbouring village of Addington. Margaret Rose La Trobe was baptised here in October 1856. La Trobe made two sketches of the building in 1857. Sketch1 Sketch2
St Michael the Archangel Litlington, East sussex
 
 
Street View
 
View Map
Church
(Grade I listed building)
A 12th century church built of flint with stone facings and with a ‘broached’ wooden spirelet atop a square weatherboard tower. Some re-modelling in the 13th and 14th centuries, with three bells dating from c.1450 to 1550s. The La Trobe family worshipped at this church when they lived at Clapham House. Agnes La Trobe married Comte Pierre de Salis-Soglio here in October 1874 (Charles Perry, the first Anglican Bishop of Melbourne, officiated). La Trobe, who died 4 December 1875, is buried in the churchyard.
Headstone  Inscription  Note
St Peter Ightham, Kent
 
 
Street View
 
View Map
Church
(Grade I listed building)
Church of Norman origin, largely rebuilt in 14th and 15th centuries. Contains splendid memorials to the builder of Ightham Mote, Sir Thomas Cawne, and to members of the Selby family, its later owners. The La Trobe family would have worshipped at this church while resident at ‘The Mote’, from December 1855 to May 1856. East window
Whitbourne Court Whitbourne, Herefordshire
 
 
View Map
House
(Grade II listed building)
Site of the manor house of the Bishop of Hereford, an early Tudor building with a Queen Anne facade and a Victorian extension at the rear. The La Trobes lived at this ‘pretty retreat’ near Worcester from September 1858 to December 1866. Beyond there were water meadows and fields. La Trobe sketch, Meadow
NOTE: Historic England (Historic Buildings and Monuments Commission for England) listed buildings:
Grade I buildings are of exceptional interest, only 2.5% of listed buildings are Grade I
Grade II* buildings are particularly important buildings of more than special interest; 5.8% of listed buildings are Grade II*
Grade II buildings are of special interest; 91.7% of all listed buildings are in this class.
 
Place Location Item Image Description
Switzerland     click images to enlarge  
Neuchâtel Canton of Neuchâtel
 
Street View
 
View Map
City Nestled at the foot of the Jura mountain range on the shore of Lake Neuchâtel, 45 km west of Berne, prominent landmarks being the Castle and the Collegiate Church. La Trobe was based in Neuchâtel for two periods in the 1820s, pursuing his personal interests, travelling and writing, and later returned many times until the end of his life. Lodging House of 1820.
Chapelle de l'Ermitage Neuchâtel


Street View
 
View Map
Memorial
chapel
Chapel built in memory of La Trobe by his second wife, Rose de Meuron (née de Montmollin) in 1878. It also commemorates the memory of their daughter, Isabelle, who died in 1874, aged 16.
Chateau Greng Canton of Fribourg, beside Lake Morat
 
 
View Map
House Beautiful chateau of Sophie’s uncle, Comte Frédéric de Pourtalès and aunt the Comtesse, with whom La Trobe corresponded regularly over the years. He first visited in 1831 and later became mentor to their son, Albert, on a two-year journey to North America. Isabelle La Trobe (1858-1874) was born here.
Pourtalès house, Neuchâtel
Chateau Oberhofen Oberhofen, Lake Thun
 
 
Street View
 
View Map
House In 1849-52 the Pourtalès family renovated and expanded the chateau to its present appearance. Agnes La Trobe visited here several times before her mother returned to Switzerland, and Charles Joseph La Trobe stayed here on his many visits to Switzerland after Sophie’s death.
La Trobe sketch, 1857
Jolimont Erlach
(Cerlier)
 
 
Street View
 
View Map
House In September 1835, Charles Joseph La Trobe and Sophie de Montmollin were married at the British Legation in Berne. They spent their honeymoon at Jolimont on the Jolimont hill above Lake Bienne. It was the property of Sophie’s uncle, Comte Frédéric de Pourtalès. In 1854 La Trobe sketched the nearby Chateau Cerlier.
La Borcarderie Valangin
 
 
Street View
 
View Map
House Country estate of Sophie’s father, Comte Frédéric Auguste de Montmollin. It is here where La Trobe nervously sought permission to marry Sophie, and where some years later daughters Eleanora and Cécile spent time while their ailing mother remained in the Montmollin family home in Neuchâtel. La Trobe sketch, 1854
L’Ermitage 40 Rue Charles-Knapp, Neuchâtel
 
 
Street View
 
View Map
House When Rose La Trobe (de Meuron) returned to Switzerland after Charles Joseph La Trobe died, she lived in this house that she had previously purchased. Part of the land was used to build the Chapelle de l'Ermitage to commemorate La Trobe and their daughter Isabelle.
Maison Montmollin 8 Place de Halles, Neuchâtel
 
 
Street View
 
View Map
House This was Sophie’s family home in Neuchâtel. Charles and Sophie had an apartment in the house after their marriage. Agnes La Trobe (1837-1916) was born in a front room overlooking the market square and lived here when she went back to Switzerland in 1845 for her education. Sophie returned here in 1853 and died in 1854. Another view
Montmirail Montmirail, La Tène
 
Street View
 
View Map
House Chateau that for many years was the site of a Moravian boarding school for girls. During his sojourn at nearby Neuchâtel in the 1820s, La Trobe walked to Montmirail on Sunday afternoons to visit his friend the principal of the school, taking in the glorious view of the Alps during his 8km journey.
St Michael Erlenbach, Simmental
 
Street View
 
View Map
Church The parsonage at Erlenbach, a few paces above the church, is where La Trobe frequently stayed with his ‘flower-loving friends’, the Studers. He shared with Rev. Studer an enthusiasm for walking in the mountains and for botany. La Trobe departed on his summer ‘rambles’ from this idyllic setting and made sketches of the surrounding scenery. Sketch1, Sketch2

 

Compiled by Helen Armstrong, presentation by John Botham
Comments and pictures to info09@latrobesociety.org.au

 

 


Scroll to top

 

La Trobe Sites